Houston's So Quickly, The Fact Up Their Recreation On New Album


Typically speaking, post hardcore is a term that most people probably find tiresome, as it gets thrown on all sorts of music nowadays. However, looking deep into the music of Houston’s So Soon, The Truth, you should find that they not only offer up insight to what the sub genre can be, but they give you hope for when you see it used in the future. On their new album, Familiar Violence, the four piece adds progression and intricate guitar to craft something you’ll want to get into your ears as soon as possible. Full of emotive vocals and hooks, they prove that while the sub genre may be tired, they’re ready to add new blood to it.

Opening with the slow yet melodic notes of “Perfect Scar,” the way these guys put together a song is immediately recognizable. The soft nature of the track means that all of the heavy drums and intricate guitar don’t fall by the wayside. The band continues the slow build on second track, “Traction,” where their use of guitar is full of complex notes. When the song starts to pick up speed, the band’s intensity joins in the uptick while they keep things interesting and full of catchy sounds. Usually when there’s this much sophisticated guitar, a listener can get lost in the notes, but that’s not the case here as the band ups the volume and proves they can get heavy quick. 

With

With “Familiar Violence,” So Soon, The Truth change things up.

Photo Courtesy of Cardigan Records

By the fourth track, “All Directions,” the band should have you locked in. The first of several standouts of the release, the loud quiet loud principle gets used well here, and the band goes from soft to heavy in seconds without losing their edge. As with most of this genre, the progressive runs on the fret board offer a melodic potency that’s hard not to delve into. While they keep that complex guitar use going on the catchy track “Separation Anxiety,” it’s the emotive ferocity of the following track “Idea of Everything” that should really grab your attention. The way the drums and guitars seem to be pushing the bounds of what instruments can do here is masterful while the vocals seem to almost punch in and out of the already memorable song.

They keep things proggy on the following track, “To a Fault,” to the degree that it should remind you of latter day At The Drive In, or early Mars Volta. That is to say, this is being done without lifting from either, though the chaotic nature of the song has those two bands stamped all over it while clocking in at a bit over six minutes, the song certainly keeps your attention from start to finish. The band closes out the album with the slow opening of “Tangible.” While the beginning is softer, they don’t wait long in turning things up and adding the complexities in full force. There’s a subtle dance that these guys do swaying between heavy and soft that’s done with such ease that it feels an sounds like second nature for them. The result is a fantastic mix of subtle nuance and fevered intensity…



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